Southeast Community Centre and Neighbourhood Park

Overview

The town is moving ahead with the construction phase of the Southeast Community Centre (SECC) and the new 0.6 hectare neighbourhood park which are anticipated to open in Fall 2020, as well as the Allan Street open space to be constructed in 2018.

To mark the end of the demolition phase of the hospital and the beginning of the construction phase for the community centre, the town officially broke ground at the site on Wednesday, September 26, 2018.

Review the news release.

Check out our official time-lapse video of the former hospital demolition and witness almost a year of deconstruction in just 2 minutes!

Image of the groundbreaking ceremony at the Southeast Community Centre site.

Image of the groundbreaking ceremony at the Southeast Community Centre site.

Construction Update: November 27, 2018

What you will see on site during the next two - three weeks:

  • Concrete formwork, rebar and concrete pouring for footings and the elevator shaft.
  • Excavation for infiltration gallery on the south side of the building.
  • Installation of a duct bank from Allan Street to the Oakville Hydro transformer location on site, and associated work.

What to expect:

  • Delivery of materials and heavy equipment.
  • Construction workers entering and leaving the site.
  • Ongoing construction activities on Saturdays.

To accommodate construction, some trees will be removed, however tree replacement plans on and around the overall site identify more trees being planted than are being removed. The SECC and park sees almost 100 trees being planted, and more trees will be planted as part of the seniors’ development and residential projects.

The site remains a construction zone and is closed to the public.

Community Centre and Neighbourhood Park

The SECC will have a modern building design that respects the adjacent heritage district as well the designated high school. It will include a 25-metre lap pool, a warm water pool, a double gymnasium, a fitness centre with a running track, multipurpose meeting rooms and space for intergenerational programming.

Oakville Hydro and the town are partnering to build a LEED-certified energy efficient building that will include rooftop solar panels, geo-thermal heating and cooling, car charging station, and a battery energy storage system.

The neighbourhood park adjacent to the community centre will including soft landscaping and trees, seating, a play structure, lawn areas, a water play area, pavilion and bicycle parking.

Review the staff reports on the March 26 Administrative Services Committee agenda, items 8, 9 and 10.

In March 2018, the town started processing a site plan application for the new community centre on the former hospital lands. For more details review the site plan application page.

Allan Street Open Space

The Allan Street Open Space, given its proximity to Wyndham manor and proposed seniors-oriented housing block, will be designed for use by nearby residents, caregivers and visiting family and friends, and will include gently sloping pathways, soft landscaping, diverse seating areas, and accessibility for wheelchairs and walkers. Construction of this space is scheduled Spring 2019.

Past meetings

Open House - February 8, 2018

Town staff held an open house to provide an update on the community centre and neighbourhood park planned for the site. Review the New Park Design & Community Centre Update presentation and the Open House display panels.

Open House — November 28, 2017

On November 28, the town held an open house where residents were invited to provide feedback on design options for the neighbourhood park. The architect for the community centre also made a presentation. Residents were invited to complete a survey on what they would like to see as part of the park design in combination with the community centre and surrounding neighbourhood.

Planning and Development Council - October 11, 2017

Council received proposed official plan and zoning amendments for the two sites. The statutory public meeting to discuss the amendments was held as part of this Planning and Development Council meeting. The proposed official plan amendment and the proposed zoning by-law amendment can be found in the October 11 staff report. For information about preserving your appeal rights go to the Making Submissions and Preserving Appeal Rights page.

Public Meeting - September 28, 2017

Public consultation sessions took place about the preliminary conceptual designs for the community centre and potential uses for the park.

Special Council Meeting - June 27, 2017

Council endorsed an overall master plan for the lands. Council also approved enhancements for the South East Community Centre: expansion of the single gym to a double gym ($470,000); therapeutic warm-water pool ($2,740,000); fitness centre ($2,550,000); and indoor walking track ($1,800,000). These features are in addition to the amenities already planned for the community centre: indoor pool (to replace Centennial Pool), multi-purpose rooms and space for intergenerational programming. Review the news release for more details or check out the June 27 Special Council Agenda for more information, including staff reports.

Special Council Meeting – May 2, 2017

Public consultation sessions took place about the preliminary conceptual designs for the community centre and potential uses for the park.

Special Council Meeting – May 2, 2017

At this meeting, Council approved the five-year review of the Parks, Recreation, Libraries Facilities Master Plan and directed staff to report back on a parks and open space strategy to address issues and opportunities for future park acquisition.

Council also received staff reports on the former hospital site project including a financial overview and information on the new South East Oakville Community Centre. Council heard from staff about several potential community centre enhancements that were identified during public consultation.  The most frequently requested items and their potential costs include: expansion of the single gym to a double gym; therapeutic warm-water pool; fitness centre and; an indoor walking track. These features are in addition to the amenities already planned for the community centre: indoor pool (to replace Centennial Pool), multi-purpose rooms and space for intergenerational programming. Council referred a final decision on the community centre’s base funding and program enhancements to the June 27 Special Meeting of Council.

Public meeting - March 8, 2017

Previous public consultation and meetings with organizations and resident groups identified many of the desired program elements and amenities to be included in the new community centre. The town hosted a public meeting on March 8 to provide an update and overview (pdf) of what we've heard to date.

Background

The creation of a community centre was recommended in the 2012 Parks, Recreation and Library Master Plan. A timeline for the overall project is available on the Former Hospital Site project timeline page.

The IPD team selected for the design and construction of the Southeast Community Centre is a multi-disciplinary team led by Graham Construction and Engineering Inc. and Diamond Schmitt Architects.

Studies

To help understand the site and its suitability for a community centre and park, the town has studied the following topics:

  • Delivery of materials and heavy equipment.
  • Construction workers entering and leaving the site.
  • Ongoing construction activities on Saturdays.

Protecting Chimney Swifts

The town is committed to working to protect the habitat of chimney swifts, a threatened migratory bird species, during the redevelopment of the former hospital site.

Current status

  • Each summer, a colony of about 150 of the birds roost in the four triple-flue chimneys of the former Oakville Trafalgar High School (OTHS).
  • Under the Endangered Species Act, the town will be required to maintain or replace existing chimney swift habitat as part of the redevelopment of the former hospital site.

Key facts

  • A structural assessment has confirmed that the former high school – a designated heritage resource – is structurally suitable for reuse and incorporation into the redevelopment concept for the site.

Next steps

  • Chimney swift habitat is one of several factors to be considered in the generation of potential designs for the new community centre.
  • Changes to the former high school will require Council approval of a heritage permit. Any changes to the chimneys will also have to be documented in compliance with the regulations set out by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry to maintain or replace chimney swift habitat.
  • The town is required to minimize the effects of construction activities on the chimney swifts.

Assessing the potential for reuse

A Building Condition Assessment of the on-site parking garage was recently completed. The intent of the study was to determine the overall condition of the parking garage and develop a budget to estimate the cost of reusing the structure as part of the new community centre.

Current status

The Building Condition Assessment is complete; a final report is underway.

Key facts

The Building Condition Assessment included a visual inspection, and did not include any destructive testing. Below is a summary of the key findings:

  • Minor deterioration of the structure including peeling paint and salt damage.
  • Certain areas did not satisfy the current regulatory standards for minimum
  • concrete cover.
  • The steel staircases have areas of significant corrosion.
  • The exterior masonry and mortar is deteriorated.
  • The glazed walls are nearing end of life.
  • 25% of the steel doors and frames are corroded.

Next steps

Further review and studies will be required during the design phase of the new community centre to fully determine the cost and feasibility of using the parking garage as part of the development.

Ensuring structural integrity for redevelopment

The town is committed to ensuring structural integrity of the former Oakville Trafalgar High School (OTHS). A structural review and building condition assessment of the former high school was conducted to determine the structural feasibility of including all or part of the heritage building as part of the new community centre. The studies also looked at the preliminary cost to restore all, or parts of, the building.

Current status

A structural review and building condition assessment of the former high school is complete. Consultants are completing a final report.

Key facts

  • Built in 1908, the former high school is a designated heritage building and is to be conserved and incorporated into the new community centre.
  • As part of the review, the consultant conducted a visual inspection only and did not include any destructive testing.
  • Overall, the building structure was found to be in good condition with no structurally significant damage, distress or deterioration. Below is a summary of the key findings:
  • The load-bearing exterior clay brick masonry walls are structurally sound with localized areas of brick damage.
  • The floor framing is in good condition with very minimal evidence of damage, distress or deterioration, except in isolated areas.
  • A section of the main floor framing in the single storey, eastern most portion of the building, has collapsed due to past water penetration.
  • No significant deterioration was observed in the second floor framing.
  • The interior finishes are in poor condition.
  • The roof, windows and doors are in fair condition but have reached the end of their life cycle.
  • The north and south elevations have been significantly altered from their original state.
  • The four chimneys that serve as a habitat for chimney swifts appear to be stable with localized areas of brick damage.
  • The mechanical and electrical systems have been disconnected and are in an advanced state of disrepair and will have to be fully replaced.

Next steps

Further review and studies will be required during the design phase of the new community centre to fully determine how best to conserve and incorporate the heritage building into the new development, as well as costs associated with this work. Heritage permit approval will be required.

Reinventing the Brantwood Site

The Brantwood site is a former school currently owned by the town. Options for the future use of the site were evaluated through the South Central Public Lands Study.

Current status

The Council-endorsed land use option for the Brantwood site includes:

  • the conversion of the oldest and front portion of the school (a designated heritage resource) to four to nine condominium apartments;
  • seven detached residential lots with frontages of approximately 15 m each along Douglas Avenue; and,
  • a parkette with a relocated playground at the corner of Douglas Avenue and Palmer Avenue.

If the retention of the front portion of the school building is not feasible (i.e. structural, environmental), five detached residential lots with frontages of approximately 15m each could be created along Allan Street.

Key facts

A multi-disciplinary team led by MB1 Development Consulting was retained to prepare a viable redevelopment and implementation plan for the Brantwood site, within the context of the work completed through the South Central Public Lands Study.

In addition, environmental studies have been undertaken on the site to confirm that there is the ability to redevelop the front portion of the Brantwood School.

Next steps

Early in 2017 a Request for Proposal (RFP) will be commissioned to identify public- private partnership opportunities for the redevelopment of the site that meets the requirements of the town and provides certainty for the long term.

How do I stay updated?

Return to this site for regular project updates.

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If you have a question or comment, please contact ServiceOakville at service@oakville.ca or call 905-845-6601.

Former Hospital Site
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