Former Hospital Site Demolition and Remediation

Overview

The town is committed to safely deconstructing the former hospital and Helen Lawson building. As such, a Demolition Strategy was developed to guide the process. The overall demolition and site remediation will take approximately 12 months to complete. The development of the new community centre will begin in late 2018 with an opening scheduled for fall 2020.

The town has awarded the Former Hospital Site demolition contract to Delsan-AIM, a company highly skilled and experienced at demolitions of this size in urban settings.

Update – September 11 to 22, 2017

What you will see on site during the next two weeks:

  • Set up pest control equipment through the site
  • Hoarding installation (solid wood fence) ongoing with completion extended to the end of October/early November
  • Interior demolition of nonstructural elements – ongoing
  • Asbestos abatement work within the hospital interior - ongoing

What to expect:

  • Minimal noise and dust
  • Flatbed trucks for heavy equipment delivery such as excavators, office trailers, demolition bins, etc.
  • Minimal  traffic or transit impact
  • Construction workers entering and leaving site

Please note: The site is now a demolition/construction zone and will remain closed to the public.

Stay up-to-date

Return to this site for regular project updates. You can also sign up for the town’s weekly e-newsletter to have town information emailed directly to your inbox.

To provide feedback or file a complaint, contact ServiceOakville:

Phone: 905-845-6601
TTY: 905-338-4200
Email: serviceoakville@oakville.ca

Overall project timeline

A timeline for the entire project is available on the Former Hospital Site Project timeline page.

Map

A map of the demolition site is available on the Former Hospital Site map page.

Demolition Strategy

On April 3, 2017 Council approved the Former Hospital Deconstruction Strategy — a comprehensive plan to safely demolish the former hospital and Helen Lawson buildings.

The overall demolition and remediation plan includes an abatement strategy for designated substances found in the buildings and on site, as well as best management practices the town will use to address community concerns over site maintenance, dust, noise, vibration and truck traffic during the demolition process.

In response to recent public feedback at the Administrative Services Committee (ASC) meeting on March 27, 2017, Council approved recommendations by ASC for additional mitigation measures including using broadband (quieter) backup alarms on trucks instead of backup beepers, and avoiding crushing or other noisy work on Saturdays.

Read the April 6, 2017 News Release – Redevelopment plans for Former Hospital site moving forward.

Demolition Fact Sheets

Purpose

  • The town is committed to safely demolishing the former hospital and Helen Lawson buildings and has a comprehensive demolition strategy to guide the process.

Current Status

  • DST Consulting Engineers developed the town’s Demolition Strategy to guide the overall demolition approach for the former hospital building and the Helen Lawson building.
  • DST has significant experience with demolition projects, including hospitals in residential neighbourhoods, complex industrial facilities and projects in tight urban settings.

Key Facts

  • Based on a review of the site, and associated services and utilities, the demolition will be completed using standard mechanical demolition methods.
  • Mechanical demolition is the most widely used method of building demolition. It involves the use of specialized mechanical equipment such as articulated lifts and cranes to demolish buildings and does not include blasting
  • The demolition of the buildings will use a 3Rs approach - reduce, reuse and recycle – with the contractor diverting as much waste as possible from landfill.

Next Steps

  • The demolition specifications are complete and include remediation measures for designated substances and best management practices for site maintenance, dust, noise, vibration and truck traffic.
  • In many cases, the town will go beyond provincial regulations and guidelines for work on a construction/demolition site
  • This summer (2017), the contractors will begin site preparation. The overall demolition and site remediation will take 12 months to complete.

Maintaining a safe and clean site

Purpose

  • The town is committed to minimizing the impact of the demolition activities on adjacent properties.

Current Status

  • Demolition specifications will include best management practices to maintain a safe and clean site.

Key Facts

  • Good site maintenance activities safeguards the health and safety of workers and the public.

Next Steps/Best Management Practices

  • The demolition specifications include the following best management practices to maintain a safe and clean site. The contractor will:
    • Install solid hoarding (i.e. plywood panels painted white vs chain linked fence)
    • Work will be conducted Monday to Friday, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    • Minimize light spillage with no work after 7 p.m.
    • Implement a rodent and pest control plan.
    • Implement odour control measures.
    • Maintain overall clean site appearance.
  • The consultant will monitor the site throughout the demolition to ensure best practices are met.

Purpose

  • The town is committed to ensuring safe soil and groundwater during the redevelopment of the former hospital site. As such, two Environmental Site Assessments were completed to determine if there was any contamination on the site.
    • A Phase One Environmental Site Assessment (ESA 1) was conducted to identify potential site contamination through records review, site visits and interviews.
    • Based on the results of the ESA 1, a Phase Two Environmental Assessment (ESA 2) was conducted to determine if there are actual contaminants on the former hospital site. It involved a series of subsurface soil and groundwater samples.

Current Status

  • The two ESAs are complete and remediation measures are included in the demolition specifications.

Key Facts

  • ESA 1 identified 18 Areas of Potential Environmental Concern (APECs)
  • ESA 2 indicated that 16 APECs had no contaminants present and one additional area was discovered during investigation.

The three identified environmental concerns/impacts being addressed are:

1. EC/SAR (Salt):

  • Found in the soil throughout the parking areas due to de-icing which is typical of sites in Ontario.
  • Found in the groundwater in one location by the parking garage as a result of salt storage.
  • Impacts will be managed in-place and/or removed to a certain depth during the future development of the site. This will also help

2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs):

  • Found in the soil around the former high school. The impact is isolated to this location and is likely the result of poor quality fill.
  • Similar to the salt, the PAH impact will be managed in place and/or removed to a certain depth during the future development of the site. This will also help control dust during the demolition phase as hard surfaces remain in place.

3. Petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs):

  • Found in the groundwater in an isolated area by the main entrance of the former hospital and does not extend past the property line. This may be associated with the historic use of lubricating oils in the adjacent mechanical room.
  • The PHCs impact will be removed from the groundwater as part of the demolition through an on-site pump system.

Next Steps

  • Ongoing testing of excavated areas to determine if soil needs to be removed to meet Ontario’s Ministry of Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) requirements.
  • Ongoing monitoring of groundwater during the remediation process to ensure that PHCs are removed and meet MOECC requirements.

Meeting Environmental Regulation

Purpose

  • The town is committed to on-site safety. As such, a Designated Substance Survey (DSS) was completed of the hospital and the Helen Lawson Building to identify the presence of designated substances and other materials requiring remediation.

Current Status

  • The DSS is complete. Hazardous materials were found to be present in some areas and abatement measures are included in the demolition specifications.

Key Facts

  • A DSS must be completed prior to any construction or demolition project in Ontario.
  • The DSS includes a visual assessment of the building and building systems as well as destructive testing and analysis of selected sample areas to determine if any remediation is required.
  • The survey identified the following substances within the buildings:
    • Asbestos containing materials (friable and non-friable)
    • Lead used in batteries for backup power supply and emergency lighting
    • Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in light fixture ballasts
    • Mercury and mercury vapour found in lighting, thermostats and switches
    • Ozone depleting substances found in air conditioning and refrigerant equipment
    • Miscellaneous materials (e.g. radioactive substances from smoke detectors, bacteria from cooling towers, etc.)
  • Other designated substances are either not present, or expected to be present, in the building in sufficient quantities to require remediation prior to demolition.

Next Steps

  • On-going monitoring and inspection of the abatement to ensure designated substances are removed and disposed of safely as per Ontario regulation and industry standards.

Ensuring demolition-related vibration is limited

Purpose

  • The town is committed to establishing controls and mitigation strategies to limit the impact of demolition-related vibration on adjacent properties.

Current Status

  • A vibration study is complete and mitigation measures are included in the demolition specifications.

Key Facts

  • Demolition activities can result in varying degrees of ground vibration depending on the equipment and methods employed.
  • Ground vibrations from demolition activities do not often reach levels that damage neighbouring structures, even if you can hear and feel them close to the site.
  • The demolition will use standard mechanical demolition methods which is not expected to generate vibration levels that exceed the maximum threshold used the Ontario Provincial Standard Specification (OPSS 120). Demolition blasting will not be used.
  • Demolition activities can generate levels of vibration that might affect telecommunication equipment, utility control systems and other sensitive electronic systems around the site.

Next Steps/Best Management Practices

  • The demolition specifications include best management practices where the general contractor will:
    • Request access to nearby homes to conduct a preconstruction video survey to determine the existing conditions of the buildings within a 75 meter (225 feet) radius of the site. Standard industry practice is to survey properties within a 30 metre (90 feet) radius of the demolition site. Given the historical character of the neighbourhood, the town extended this to a 75 meter (225 feet) radius.
    • Use six seismographs (size of a laptop) around the site to ensure vibration levels remains below the maximum (10 mm/s) allowable threshold. Given the historical character of the neighbourhood, the town has set the maximum threshold for demolition vibration to 10mm/s which is significantly lower than the maximum allowable value of 50mm/s (as per OPSS 120).
    • Remotely monitor vibration levels throughout the demolition to ensure best practices are met.

Working to limit demolition-related noise

Purpose

  • The town is committed to establishing controls and mitigation strategies to limit the impact of noise on adjacent properties.

Current Status

  • A noise study is complete and mitigation measures are included in the demolition specifications.

Key Facts

  • Existing sources of sound along the neighbouring streets and properties used to determine pre-demolition/ baseline noise levels.
  • The baseline noise levels were compared against estimated noise levels generated from demolition activities to determine compliance with applicable legislation, and to determine if there will be a need for mitigation strategies.
  • Overall noise levels related to on-site concrete crushing were compared to noise levels generated by the demolition activities without on-site crushing.
  • The results indicate that the noise generated from the demolition work will be below the maximum threshold established by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) Publication NPC-208.
  • There will be no significant difference to the overall noise level from demolition activities if concrete crushing is done on site.
  • During demolition activities, noise levels for neighbouring properties may increase at times from light traffic noise to highway traffic noise.

Next Steps/Best Management Practices

  • The demolition specifications include the following best management practices, where the contractor will:
    • Install a 3 metre high (10 feet) noise barrier (fence) along the perimeter of the site.
    • Install a 5 metre high (15 feet) noise barrier around the concrete crusher. Barrier may be a combination of stockpiled materials and fencing, and crusher may be installed below grade.
    • Locate the crusher in an area surrounded by other equipment / structures and in the centre of the site.
    • No construction vehicles idling on street and minimal on-site idling.
    • Work will be conducted Monday to Friday, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
    • If any Saturday is required, it may not include crushing or other noisy work.
    • Use broadband (quieter) back up alarms on trucks instead of back up beepers.
    • Comply with the town's noise by-law.
    • Comply with sustainable demolition best practices by crushing concrete on site and using it to backfill the excavation rather than exporting the concrete to be crushed on site and importing material to backfill.
    • Distribute noise sources around the demolition site and keep them apart as much as possible.
    • Keep noise sources away from the property boundary as much as possible.
    • Minimize drop heights to control falling materials.

• We will monitor noise levels throughout the demolition to ensure best practices are met.

Ensuring demolition-related dust is limited

Purpose

  • The town is committed to establishing controls and mitigation strategies to limit the impact of dust on adjacent properties during demolition.

Current Status

  • The dust study is complete and mitigation measures are included in the demolition specifications.

Key Facts

  • Research and modelling were conducted to estimate dust levels that will be generated by the demolition process.
  • Results of the study indicate that dust levels from the demolition work will be well below Ontario’s Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) criteria (O.Reg. 419/05) for health and visibility.

Next Steps/Best Management Practices

  • The contractor will comply with the town’s Nuisance and, Health Protection and Air Quality by-laws.
  • While we are below MOECC criteria, the demolition specification will include best management practices to further limit the impact of dust on adjacent properties.

To control dust generated by truck traffic the contractor will:

  • Wet down unpaved roads in the demolition site.
  • Maintain paved surfaces to reduce dust.
  • Power wash trucks before leaving the site.
  • Tarp trucks leaving the site loaded with demolition debris or soil.

To control dust generated by demolition activities the contractor will:

  • Adjust demolition activities or suspend work under high wind conditions.
  • Use water misting to damp down dusty activities.
  • Locate dusty activities in the centre of the site, when possible.
  • Minimize drop heights to control falling materials.
  • Temporarily cover earthworks and concrete crushing activities as required.
     
  • We will monitor dust levels throughout the demolition to ensure best practices are met.

 

Ensuring safe, equitable and adequate parking

The town is committed to safe, equitable and adequate parking in all communities. An on-street parking study of roadways around the former hospital site was undertaken to re-evaluate existing parking restrictions and provide updated recommendations for a parking strategy in the area.

Current status

  • In the spring of 2016, a review of the use of available on-street parking was completed, and options for updated parking restrictions were prepared and evaluated.
  • In June 2016, the recommended option for on-street parking was presented to the public to gather resident and stakeholder feedback.
  • The parking recommendations were subsequently presented to, and passed by, Council in September 2016.
  • The implementation of the updated parking restrictions is underway.

Key facts

  • New on-street parking changes include allowing parking on both sides of wider streets.
  • This option distributes on-street parking more equitably throughout the neighbourhood and is consistent with on-street parking in other parts of Oakville.

Next steps

  • Future parking restrictions may apply during the demolition and construction phases at the former hospital site. Any changes will be discussed with, and communicated to, the community.

Ensuring safe, equitable and adequate parking

The town is committed to safe, equitable and adequate parking in all communities. An on-street parking study of roadways around the former hospital site was undertaken to re-evaluate existing parking restrictions and provide updated recommendations for a parking strategy in the area.

Current status

  • In the spring of 2016, a review of the use of available on-street parking was completed, and options for updated parking restrictions were prepared and evaluated.
  • In June 2016, the recommended option for on-street parking was presented to the public to gather resident and stakeholder feedback.
  • The parking recommendations were subsequently presented to, and passed by, Council in September 2016.
  • The implementation of the updated parking restrictions is underway.

Key facts

  • New on-street parking changes include allowing parking on both sides of wider streets.
  • This option distributes on-street parking more equitably throughout the neighbourhood and is consistent with on-street parking in other parts of Oakville.

Next steps

  • Future parking restrictions may apply during the demolition and construction phases at the former hospital site. Any changes will be discussed with, and communicated to, the community.

Past Public Engagement

Demolition Strategy Open House – March 1, 2017
The town hosted an open house on March 1, 2017 to present demolition strategy for the former hospital and Helen Lawson buildings, which included abatement and demolition activities, performance guidelines and best management practices, results of various studies and mitigation measures to minimize dust, noise and truck traffic. Residents provided feedback on the demolition strategy, including question and concerns about the truck traffic plan and work schedule.

Former Hospital Site Project Open House  — December 1, 2016
At the December 2016 open house about the overall Former Hospital Site Project, residents had questions and concerns about the future demolition, including dust, noise, and traffic control and a desire to have a well-kept site

What’s next

May 2, 2017 – A Special Council Meeting will be held where Council will hear about the results of the Parks Recreation and Library Master Plan update, the proposed amenities and program requirements for the community centre, and the next steps in the project regarding the overall site planning options.

Further public engagement about the community centre, park and future residential will take place this spring before coming back to Council in June.

April 3, 2017 – the Former Hospital Deconstruction Strategy is approved by Council.

A staff report, including the feedback from residents, on the demolition strategy went to Administrative Services Committee on March 27, 2017.

Contact

Questions and concerns may be directed to formerhospitalsite@oakville.ca and responses will be posted on this site for all residents.

Former Hospital Site

FAQs