Oakville Harbour West Shoreline Rehabilitation

Phase 3 is complete!

Join us for our grand reopening event

Friday, November 8, 2019
noon to 2 p.m.
Ribbon cutting at 12:15 p.m.

Phase 3 of the Oakville Harbour redevelopment is along the Lake Ontario Shoreline. The work runs from the west pier over to Waterworks Park -- a distance of approximately 500 metres. The improvements for this area include connecting trails, seating area, cobble beach areas, lighting, interpretive panels, landscaping, butterfly garden, and rehabilitation of the shoreline including improved aquatic habitats. 

  • Check out the drone footage of the shoreline before and after construction.
Image of the Lake Ontario shoreline between Kerr Street and Walker Street.

Image of the Lake Ontario shoreline between Kerr Street and Walker Street.

Background

In 2007, the Town of Oakville identified that the west shore of Oakville Harbour and adjacent parks were in need of updates and improvements. A master plan was developed through consultation with local residents and stakeholders, and Council approved the final plan in 2009. The master plan covers a significant waterfront area and makes specific recommendations for Shipyard Park, Tannery Park, Walker Street Promenade and Waterworks Park. In 2012, Town Council approved funding for the first of five phases to implement the master plan.

On June 26, 2018, the town held a Tannery & Waterworks Parks Shoreline Improvements Open House for residents to review the plans and learn more about the proposed improvements.

Because a large portion of this work required infilling into Lake Ontario, a Class Environmental Assessment was completed in 2015. Due to the sensitive nature of this work along the shoreline, the extensive review process involved many regulatory agencies.

Engineering drawings have been prepared to construct the new shoreline and to detail the careful placement of armourstone to create fish habitat. Permits and approval for the new shoreline development have been provided by:

  • Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO)
  • Transport Canada
  • Ministry of Natural Resources & Forestry (MNRF)
  • Ministry of Environment and Climate Change (MOECC)
  • Conservation Halton (CH)
  • Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nations

The town has worked with these agencies to create aquatic habitat that will improve this section of the lake. Once work is completed, the habitat will be greatly improved to better than pre-construction conditions. Working with MNRF, the town has included a special habitat for the American Eel to assist this endangered species.

Mitigation measures and procedures were put in place to ensure minimal impact to the wildlife and surrounding habitat during construction.

Completed Work

Rehabilitation of the shoreline at Oyster Bay – the small bay immediately south of the Oakville Yacht Club, has undergone shoreline rehabilitation. The existing shoreline was reinforced with new armourstone and will also support the proposed walkway upgrades to the adjacent lands. This work was completed in March 2014.

Relocation and renovations of the historic Lyon's Log Cabin. The historic log cabin was moved to a permanent location near the Lakeshore Road bridge. The cabin has been restored and placed on a permanent concrete foundation. The restoration was completed by May 2014.

Tannery Park ‘Transitional Node’ – this work involved landscape and walkway upgrades between the Tannery Park washroom and the upgraded Oyster Bay shoreline. The work also included a new accessible walkway from the water’s edge to the washroom, along with a new set of stairs, extensive plantings, new lighting, heritage/historical displays, and new seating areas. The work was completed in December 2014.

Phase 2 of the Oakville Harbour redevelopment includes a pedestrian observation platform with seating, a sculptural beacon, new and reconstructed walkways, picnic area, interpretive signs, new lighting, slope naturalization plantings and restoration.

The main focus of the redevelopment is the observation platform and sculptural beacon, which are located atop "Tannery Hill", a man-made landform constructed with fill material between 1960-1970. The intent of the design is to provide a landmark walkway and seating to facilitate views of Lake Ontario and the Oakville Harbour throughout the year during all weather conditions. The observation platform is overhanging the existing slope to exaggerate the vantage elevation at the top of the hill and to maximize views to the lake and Sixteen Mile Creek. The beacon is a representation of "land and water", integrating compass direction and patterning of sun reflections on water ripples.