1805-1857

In 1805 the lands of the Mississauga People between Burlington Bay and Etobicoke were purchased by the Crown. Only then could the Dundas street connecting Toronto and Hamilton be completed, and the survey of lands between the Dundas "Street" and Lake Ontario be started. In the area which is now called the Town of Oakville, the settlement of Europeans began after 1806.

The first survey named this area the Township of Alexander. However, the Battle of Trafalgar took place only weeks after the survey was completed, and those responsible changed the name to Trafalgar to commemorate this famous battle where Nelson died.

The Mississauga People retained an important concessions at the mouths of the Sixteen and Twelve Mile Creeks where they continued to hunt, fish and plant their corn fields. Following surrender of these lands in 1820, the first settlement to be developed was at the mouth of the Twelve-Mile Creek, at a public auction in 1826. No survey or settlement took place on the 960 acres at the Sixteen until William Chisholm purchased it in 1827.

Lots bordering Dundas Street were developed first, while those close to the lake, being further from transportation, were settled much later. In 1812 it was reported that there were only twenty-six settlers on the twenty miles of lakeshore between Burlington Bay and the River Credit. In all of Trafalgar Township only three taverns and stagecoach stops, all on the Dundas road, existed prior to the development of the harbours at the Twelve-Mile and Sixteen Creeks.

The majority of the first settlers in Trafalgar Township were United Empire Loyalists, some of the 40,000 "Tories" that moved out of the USA to Canada following the American Revolution. Lots were granted through a lottery, but few of the lots remained in the new owner's possession for long. Of the fifty owners closest to Oakville shown on the original 1806 survey, only four appeared on the 1868 records, - Munn, Thomas, McCraney and Anderson.

It was only after William Chisholm had completed his payments for the land to the Crown that the first plan for the village could be completed. In 1833 fifty lots were offered at an auction held in the Oakville House. Chisholm named his development "The Town of Oakville", although in fact the settlement was a village. It became a town only in 1857 when its population reached two thousand persons.

The survey of 1833 shows a shipyard, sawmill and grain warehouse. Set aside for public use was a park called George's Square that was named after the founder's father.

1805-1857

In 1805 the lands of the Mississauga People between Burlington Bay and Etobicoke were purchased by the Crown. Only then could the Dundas street connecting Toronto and Hamilton be completed, and the survey of lands between the Dundas "Street" and Lake Ontario be started. In the area which is now called the Town of Oakville, the settlement of Europeans began after 1806.

The first survey named this area the Township of Alexander. However, the Battle of Trafalgar took place only weeks after the survey was completed, and those responsible changed the name to Trafalgar to commemorate this famous battle where Nelson died.

The Mississauga People retained an important concessions at the mouths of the Sixteen and Twelve Mile Creeks where they continued to hunt, fish and plant their corn fields. Following surrender of these lands in 1820, the first settlement to be developed was at the mouth of the Twelve-Mile Creek, at a public auction in 1826. No survey or settlement took place on the 960 acres at the Sixteen until William Chisholm purchased it in 1827.

Lots bordering Dundas Street were developed first, while those close to the lake, being further from transportation, were settled much later. In 1812 it was reported that there were only twenty-six settlers on the twenty miles of lakeshore between Burlington Bay and the River Credit. In all of Trafalgar Township only three taverns and stagecoach stops, all on the Dundas road, existed prior to the development of the harbours at the Twelve-Mile and Sixteen Creeks.

The majority of the first settlers in Trafalgar Township were United Empire Loyalists, some of the 40,000 "Tories" that moved out of the USA to Canada following the American Revolution. Lots were granted through a lottery, but few of the lots remained in the new owner's possession for long. Of the fifty owners closest to Oakville shown on the original 1806 survey, only four appeared on the 1868 records, - Munn, Thomas, McCraney and Anderson.

It was only after William Chisholm had completed his payments for the land to the Crown that the first plan for the village could be completed. In 1833 fifty lots were offered at an auction held in the Oakville House. Chisholm named his development "The Town of Oakville", although in fact the settlement was a village. It became a town only in 1857 when its population reached two thousand persons.

The survey of 1833 shows a shipyard, sawmill and grain warehouse. Set aside for public use was a park called George's Square that was named after the founder's father.